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juliedillon:

juliedillon:

Imagined Realms: Book 1

I have launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund the first issue of Imagined Realms, an annual art publication featuring positive and diverse representations of women in fantasy and science fiction. Each book will feature 10 exclusive and new illustrations created by me specifically for the book.  

Available for purchase are the printed books, 6”x8” and 11”x14” print packs that have all 10 illustrations, limited edition fine art giclees, and a downloadable process video showing my digital painting method. 

Please check it out and spread the word! 

We’re a third of the way there on just the first day! :) Thanks so much, everyone! 

crypticink asked:

Hello. On building a community- Your vision is grand, and I'd love to contribute or even just be a part of it in any way. Please, if you have more to tell on it, I'm so anxious to hear and talk about!

Hey Cryticlink,

Thank you so much for your interests and encouragement! Sorry for taking so long to respond to you. I started a new job last week and have either been too busy or too exhausted from working on my feet all day to check or update my social media sites these last few days.

I would absolutely be interested in collaboration and/or co-hosting if you are interested! I’m not exactly sure what format to move forward with for the “Stay At Home Art Student” thing—whether as a traditional vlog/ vlog brothers type channel with field trips and weekly progress updates(from me and possibly other students) and community art challenges….or more of a weekly google hangout  for all of us online students, no matter what online programs we’re enrolled in. It might end up beings a mixture of both…but I’ll let you know more once I have some solid plans! If you have any ideas of your own, please feel free to share! I want to make sure this IS community oriented. 

P.s.: I took a look at your artwork and it’s AMAZING! I absolutely love your animal drawings! Are you currently enrolled in any online programs yourself?

Can I Get the Opinions of Some Aspiring and Professional Artists…?

So… I’ve been mulling over an idea for the last few weeks….I began my journey from  web-cartoonist to illustration student in early January. I’ve been doing Chris Oatley’s Magic Box  (20$ a month)and Watt’s Atelier Online (100$ a month) and have been contemplating signing up late for Noah Bradley’s Art Camp (250$ for 12 weeks) or just signing up for the next session in November. I just started a job at Whole Foods, but otherwise I spend almost all of my time studying art: Drawing, painting, teaching myself about and copying the old masters, reading blog post by those I consider living masters, watching process videos, stalking around student forums, etc… In short, I’ve been learning how to be a Stay-At-Home Art Student—how to be disciplined, how to be consistent, how to focus, how to check my ego and focus on the absolute basics, how to take the leap and try something I don’t feel ready for, and just how to enjoy the process of learning and discovering. I used to believe that I was a fraud that I couldn’t draw…but now I see that’s ridiculous, how there were just gaps in my knowledge and what I did know was built on an unsteady knowledge of the basics…and I’ve found a path that appears to be changing that. It’s been a huge shift for me in how I view myself and how I view my work. I see a lot of my fellow artists— aspiring, professional, hobbyists, etc. who really struggle with those same fears and insecurities. Those who want to learn more but don’t know where to start or perhaps aren’t ready to make a financial investment in an online program.

I’ve been considering starting a weekly vlog or special group Tumblr about being an independent art student. Noah Bradley wrote an excellent article on how to make your own art education …but what does that look like in practice? Who do you choose to study from? Where do you start? What if there isn’t a museum or a life drawing class in your area? What supplies do you choose? How do you balance a job with your education? What programs do you choose? How do you dance with the fear and the resistances and throw out the ego?

I don’t have all of those answers…in fact, my answer is going to be entirely subjective and might not be for everyone. But it would be a visual journal of my journey and might, hopefully, help inspire others to find their own direction.

My query after that lengthy explanation is this…is this something anyone might be interested in? I worry about putting myself out there because I don’t want to seem exhibitionist or attention-seeking or like I have it all figured out(I don’t), but my goal is always to inspire and help however I can. Are you interested in the perspective from a fellow novice whose finding her path? In personal review’s of various online programs or books on art? Would anyone want to participate or share their journey’s as well or create an online community together? 

Also for my homework this week, I finished masking off all of the shapes in my Thumbelina piece and did a quick value study/base in a monochromatic color scheme. Essentially my “underpainting”. 
I’m also including my photo reference, the initial rough sketch, and a small portion of my thumbnails since I forgot to make that process post last week. I tried to find the best angle for the scene and decide what Thumbelina would look like. After that, I did my first sketch in my gray-toned sketchbook using graphite and a white charcoal pencil. I was very unsatisfied with the lack of atmospheric light in the sketch, so I scanned it into photo shop and used the gradient tool until I was happy. My anatomy was also way off and I didn’t know quite how I was going to approach the shading, so I took about twenty or so reference photos of my head and hands in of a glass bottle. With my reference also open, I printed out an enlarged version of my sketch and light boxed it onto bristol board. Once I had my drawing transferred, I flipped my paper over and did further corrections with a red pencil. I still didn’t like how my android fairy looked, so I drew him onto tracing paper and completely reworked him before transferring him back into the composition. Then I began the long and arduous task of shading—laying in my mid tones, finding my darkest darks, reworking my highlights and brighter areas back in with an eraser. It took a long while for me to finish the graphite stage, which can be seen here.
It was a long process thus far, but I’m only getting started. Now onto the color comps! :D
Zoom Info
Also for my homework this week, I finished masking off all of the shapes in my Thumbelina piece and did a quick value study/base in a monochromatic color scheme. Essentially my “underpainting”. 
I’m also including my photo reference, the initial rough sketch, and a small portion of my thumbnails since I forgot to make that process post last week. I tried to find the best angle for the scene and decide what Thumbelina would look like. After that, I did my first sketch in my gray-toned sketchbook using graphite and a white charcoal pencil. I was very unsatisfied with the lack of atmospheric light in the sketch, so I scanned it into photo shop and used the gradient tool until I was happy. My anatomy was also way off and I didn’t know quite how I was going to approach the shading, so I took about twenty or so reference photos of my head and hands in of a glass bottle. With my reference also open, I printed out an enlarged version of my sketch and light boxed it onto bristol board. Once I had my drawing transferred, I flipped my paper over and did further corrections with a red pencil. I still didn’t like how my android fairy looked, so I drew him onto tracing paper and completely reworked him before transferring him back into the composition. Then I began the long and arduous task of shading—laying in my mid tones, finding my darkest darks, reworking my highlights and brighter areas back in with an eraser. It took a long while for me to finish the graphite stage, which can be seen here.
It was a long process thus far, but I’m only getting started. Now onto the color comps! :D
Zoom Info
Also for my homework this week, I finished masking off all of the shapes in my Thumbelina piece and did a quick value study/base in a monochromatic color scheme. Essentially my “underpainting”. 
I’m also including my photo reference, the initial rough sketch, and a small portion of my thumbnails since I forgot to make that process post last week. I tried to find the best angle for the scene and decide what Thumbelina would look like. After that, I did my first sketch in my gray-toned sketchbook using graphite and a white charcoal pencil. I was very unsatisfied with the lack of atmospheric light in the sketch, so I scanned it into photo shop and used the gradient tool until I was happy. My anatomy was also way off and I didn’t know quite how I was going to approach the shading, so I took about twenty or so reference photos of my head and hands in of a glass bottle. With my reference also open, I printed out an enlarged version of my sketch and light boxed it onto bristol board. Once I had my drawing transferred, I flipped my paper over and did further corrections with a red pencil. I still didn’t like how my android fairy looked, so I drew him onto tracing paper and completely reworked him before transferring him back into the composition. Then I began the long and arduous task of shading—laying in my mid tones, finding my darkest darks, reworking my highlights and brighter areas back in with an eraser. It took a long while for me to finish the graphite stage, which can be seen here.
It was a long process thus far, but I’m only getting started. Now onto the color comps! :D
Zoom Info
Also for my homework this week, I finished masking off all of the shapes in my Thumbelina piece and did a quick value study/base in a monochromatic color scheme. Essentially my “underpainting”. 
I’m also including my photo reference, the initial rough sketch, and a small portion of my thumbnails since I forgot to make that process post last week. I tried to find the best angle for the scene and decide what Thumbelina would look like. After that, I did my first sketch in my gray-toned sketchbook using graphite and a white charcoal pencil. I was very unsatisfied with the lack of atmospheric light in the sketch, so I scanned it into photo shop and used the gradient tool until I was happy. My anatomy was also way off and I didn’t know quite how I was going to approach the shading, so I took about twenty or so reference photos of my head and hands in of a glass bottle. With my reference also open, I printed out an enlarged version of my sketch and light boxed it onto bristol board. Once I had my drawing transferred, I flipped my paper over and did further corrections with a red pencil. I still didn’t like how my android fairy looked, so I drew him onto tracing paper and completely reworked him before transferring him back into the composition. Then I began the long and arduous task of shading—laying in my mid tones, finding my darkest darks, reworking my highlights and brighter areas back in with an eraser. It took a long while for me to finish the graphite stage, which can be seen here.
It was a long process thus far, but I’m only getting started. Now onto the color comps! :D
Zoom Info
Also for my homework this week, I finished masking off all of the shapes in my Thumbelina piece and did a quick value study/base in a monochromatic color scheme. Essentially my “underpainting”. 
I’m also including my photo reference, the initial rough sketch, and a small portion of my thumbnails since I forgot to make that process post last week. I tried to find the best angle for the scene and decide what Thumbelina would look like. After that, I did my first sketch in my gray-toned sketchbook using graphite and a white charcoal pencil. I was very unsatisfied with the lack of atmospheric light in the sketch, so I scanned it into photo shop and used the gradient tool until I was happy. My anatomy was also way off and I didn’t know quite how I was going to approach the shading, so I took about twenty or so reference photos of my head and hands in of a glass bottle. With my reference also open, I printed out an enlarged version of my sketch and light boxed it onto bristol board. Once I had my drawing transferred, I flipped my paper over and did further corrections with a red pencil. I still didn’t like how my android fairy looked, so I drew him onto tracing paper and completely reworked him before transferring him back into the composition. Then I began the long and arduous task of shading—laying in my mid tones, finding my darkest darks, reworking my highlights and brighter areas back in with an eraser. It took a long while for me to finish the graphite stage, which can be seen here.
It was a long process thus far, but I’m only getting started. Now onto the color comps! :D
Zoom Info

Also for my homework this week, I finished masking off all of the shapes in my Thumbelina piece and did a quick value study/base in a monochromatic color scheme. Essentially my “underpainting”. 

I’m also including my photo reference, the initial rough sketch, and a small portion of my thumbnails since I forgot to make that process post last week. I tried to find the best angle for the scene and decide what Thumbelina would look like. After that, I did my first sketch in my gray-toned sketchbook using graphite and a white charcoal pencil. I was very unsatisfied with the lack of atmospheric light in the sketch, so I scanned it into photo shop and used the gradient tool until I was happy. My anatomy was also way off and I didn’t know quite how I was going to approach the shading, so I took about twenty or so reference photos of my head and hands in of a glass bottle. With my reference also open, I printed out an enlarged version of my sketch and light boxed it onto bristol board. Once I had my drawing transferred, I flipped my paper over and did further corrections with a red pencil. I still didn’t like how my android fairy looked, so I drew him onto tracing paper and completely reworked him before transferring him back into the composition. Then I began the long and arduous task of shading—laying in my mid tones, finding my darkest darks, reworking my highlights and brighter areas back in with an eraser. It took a long while for me to finish the graphite stage, which can be seen here.

It was a long process thus far, but I’m only getting started. Now onto the color comps! :D

For last weeks Magic Box homework I went back to my color comps and, at the suggestion of  fellow student, softened up some of my edges with the gradient tool to get rid of the “cut paper” look my comps had started to take on. I’m definitely happy with the results! It feels a bit more painterly and demensional and I’m a bit more confident about using it as a base for the painting stage. :D

Now I move onto the actual brushwork tonight. It’s a little daunting and I have no idea where to actually start…but I’m gonna re-watch the class video and just dive right in. :) 

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